Statistics

Morphing gamblers

A piece of cake statistics isn’t. Not for me. My first class was hard enough. I persevered and did well with it, but I really broke a sweat. Then there was my second class, and the textbook, Grinstead and Snell’s Introduction to Probability, really took the starch out of me. This dense, proof-heavy text, barren of concrete examples (or so it seemed to me) gave me the glicks. Gambling The history of statistics is bound closely to the world of gambling.

Endline link bucket

My daily review (blogs, news, papers, plots) exposed me to a few things that I looked up, and this is a capture of some links. Thomas Basbøll will like this post (analogy between common—indeed, inevitable—mistakes in drawing, and inevitable mistakes in statistical reasoning).. From Andrew Gelman. Examples of summarizing data. The Millennium Villages Project: a retrospective, observational, endline evaluation. Andrew’s example of how to do it. Worth studying for the research approach and statistical analysis.

BMI, Exercise, and Diabetes

Introduction This analysis illustrates logistic regression. On GitHub. Diabetes is one of the most common and costly chronic diseases. An estimated 23.1 million people in the United States are diagnosed with diabetes at a cost of more than $245 billion per year. (National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pdfs/data/statistics/national-diabetes-statistics-report.pdf) In this report I consider the question, are exercise level and body mass index predictive of diabetes?